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Our School: Hockinson High School

Our School: HHS Hawks

 

Our school: Hockinson Hawks

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A small school with a large heart

Student leaders Brandi Webb and Jake Rogers describe what makes Hockinson High School so special.

One might consider Brandi Webb the unofficial leader of Hockinson High School spirit.

A senior, Webb is in the ASB class but does not hold an official position.

“But I’m everywhere,” Webb said.

School assemblies. Sporting events. Drama productions. Pretty much any Hockinson get-together, there she is, sporting her school colors.

Brandi Webb is all-in for Hockinson High School, that student who seems to be at every extra-curricular event, showing off her school spirit. Photo courtesy Brandi Webb
Brandi Webb is all-in for Hockinson High School, that student who seems to be at every extra-curricular event, showing off her school spirit. Photo courtesy Brandi Webb

“I’m very loud, naturally,” Webb said. “I love showing support for everybody.”

Hockinson, through the years, has become a big name in Washington via its football program. But Hockinson remains a small school. 

“Everyone knows everyone in a way,” Webb said. 

So the Hawks flock together, stay together, and really enjoy each other’s company.

“I would say what makes Hockinson special is how small it is and how everyone knows everyone,” said junior Jake Rogers. “We have a really strong community. Whenever I need help with anything, I can always find the help from the teachers or another student. I know just about everyone, so I can always find someone to help me with anything I need help with, with school or other things.

“When I think of Hockinson, small community, small town, where everyone gets along, and everyone supports everyone,” Rogers added.

Webb can attest to that. 

She appreciates seeing the school colors throughout the community.

“I just think of home. We are not even a town. We don’t have a post office. But we’re still such a small town in reality,” Webb said. “A nice place to be. Quiet and peaceful. Homey.”

Jake Rogers said he appreciates going to a small school, where he can always find help from teachers and students who he knows, really knows. Photo courtesy Jake Rogers
Jake Rogers said he appreciates going to a small school, where he can always find help from teachers and students who he knows, really knows. Photo courtesy Jake Rogers

These days, Rogers said it hits him pretty hard when he sees the Hockinson signs in his neighbor’s yard. Oh, he loves the support, but it just reminds him that he is not in class.

“Seeing those makes me miss being in school and being with the community,” he said.

When things return to normal, tough, he is sure to just smile when he sees the school colors.

“It shows me that my community really supports all the sports,” said Rogers, who plays football and throws on the track and field team. “Everyone in Hockinson pretty much supports everything the school does.”

For now, like all students in Washington, it is just a waiting game. The Hawks are hoping they will get to return to school this academic year. Webb is hoping to be able to hold Mr. Hockinson, a fundraiser for the Pink Lemonade Project. Webb is helping with the coordination of the event, much like she would do with any other big event at her school. 

“I miss seeing everybody,” Webb said. “I am a social butterfly. I’m very extroverted. It hurts my heart a little bit.”

“I miss seeing my friends and all of my teachers,” Rogers added.

While this shutdown is unprecedented at Hockinson, the months away will not take away from all that Webb has experienced.

“It kind of means everything,” she said of Hockinson. “I’m always at the school. It’s been the best four years of my life.”

Advice to fellow students during the shutdown:

“Make the best of it,” Webb said. “I know the teachers are sending emails. I suggest keeping up on work.”

Oh, and keep a positive attitude.

“Don’t lose hope,” she said. “Keep looking at the pictures of all the memories.”

She shared some to her fellow seniors, and it started an online conversation.

And to the younger students, when school resumes, she suggests they take advantage of every occasion to support one another, to go to the big game, to support the arts. 

“You never know when a time like this can happen,” she said.

Rogers has good advice, too.

“Don’t just sit on your couch at home. Go on a walk. Try to do fun activities with your family to help stay active and not go insane in your house.”





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